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Cave & Karst Science (ISSN 1356-191X)

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Contents of Cave & Karst Science 33(1)

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Cave and Karst Science (iv + 48pp) (PDF 5.1MB)     Individual articles may be available below
GUNN, John and David LOWE (eds.). (2006). Cave and Karst Science 33(1). Buxton: British Cave Research Association. £1.75 plus postage. ISSN 1356-191X. iv + 48pp, A4, with photos, maps and diagrams.
This issue has a cover date of 2006 (April) and was published in December 2006.
The Transactions of the British Cave Research Association
Front cover photo (page i)
by Tony WALTHAM.
(The front cover photo is not available online).
The main entrance to Goyden Pot, in Nidderdale, Yorkshire, during a mild flood. Under these conditions a substantial part of the River Nidd fails to sink into its normal route through Manchester Hole, and flows on down the usually dry river bed; it then runs into the Goyden Pot entrance, to rejoin the perennial underground flow in the River Passage. For more information about the caves of Nidderdale, see the article by Stephen Craven in this Issue. Photograph by Tony Waltham.
 
Notes for contributors (page ii) (PDF 184KB)   
 
Contents (pp1-2) (PDF 155KB)   
 
Editorial (pp3-4) (PDF 162KB)   
by David LOWE and John GUNN.
Featuring Guest editorials from Trevor Faulkner and David Gibson.
 
Millipede (Diplopoda) fauna of the Dark Cave (Gua Gelap), Batu Caves, Selangor, Malaysia: species composition and ecological observations (pp5-8) (PDF 854KB)   
by Max MOSELEY.
Millipedes are conspicuous and abundant in the Dark Cave, but there are few published records and thus uncertainty about the species composition of the fauna. There is also doubt about the ecological status and ecology of the three species reported from the cave (Plusioglyphyiulus grandicollis, Ascetophacus macclurei and Orthomorpha fluminoris). This paper reports some new records and field and laboratory observations that clarify some of these points.
Classification: Paper.
Date: Received 08 April 06; accepted 10 July 06.
Bibliograph: MOSELEY, Max. (2006). Millipede (Diplopoda) fauna of the Dark Cave (Gua Gelap), Batu Caves, Selangor, Malaysia: species composition and ecological observations. Cave and Karst Science 33(1), pp5-8.
 
The antiquity of Aillwee Cave calcite deposits, Burren District, Ireland (pp9-10) (PDF 292KB)   
by Joyce LUNDBERG and David P DREW.
A layered calcite coating over ancient cave fill in Aillwee Cave, Co. Clare, Ireland, yielded a suite of four U-Th dates ranging in stratigraphical order from 441 (-44+79) ka to infinity. These mid-Pleistocene dates are the oldest finite dates from a cave in Ireland, and are clearly distinct from the (few) previously published dates, which are generally Holocene. They suggest that this cave had already been formed and partly re-filled by the mid-Pleistocene. Passage morphology and orientation indicate that topographical and hydrological conditions during cave formation were markedly different from those operating today.
Classification: Paper.
Date: Received 14 March 2006; Accepted 01 July 2006.
Bibliograph: LUNDBERG, Joyce and David P DREW. (2006). The antiquity of Aillwee Cave calcite deposits, Burren District, Ireland. Cave and Karst Science 33(1), pp9-10.
 
Limestone dissolution in phreatic conditions at maximum rates and in pure, cold, water (pp11-20) (PDF 420KB)   
by Trevor FAULKNER.
This paper reviews contemporary knowledge about the physical and chemical factors that govern the inception and enlargement phases of phreatic karst passages. A model is then presented to determine the conditions that allow dissolution at maximum rates. This builds on the known finding that wall retreat rates are dependent on the degree of saturation of the water, which in turn depends on the temperature and on the concentration of CO2 in the input stream. However, it also follows from the theoretical equations that conduits can enlarge at high rates if the flow through them is sufficiently great that the solution remains well-below saturation, even if the input contains no carbon dioxide at all, and especially at low temperature. Examples of fractures that achieved breakthrough and then enlarged at high rates to explorable dimensions in almost pure water at near-freezing temperatures are found in the metamorphic Caledonides, where many short caves formed phreatically during deglacial high-flow conditions at the start of the Holocene.
Classification: Paper.
Date: Received 10 April 2006; Accepted 07 June 2006.
Keywords: laminar, turbulent, breakthrough, dissolution rate, higher-order kinetics, hydraulic ratio, limiting recharge point, deglacial.
Bibliograph: FAULKNER, Trevor. (2006). Limestone dissolution in phreatic conditions at maximum rates and in pure, cold, water. Cave and Karst Science 33(1), pp11-20.
 
Hoga island, Sulawesi, Indonesia: geomorphology and groundwater resources of a small tropical carbonate island (pp21-28) (PDF 1.2MB)   
by Alan P DYKES and John GUNN.
This paper provides the first report of the geomorphology and hydrogeology of Hoga island, a small tropical carbonate island in southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia, based on reconnaissance field explorations and surveys. Hoga is being developed as a specialist 'ecotourism' destination, and a sustainable water supply is one of the important development issues. The island comprises 3.42km2 of low-lying hard, but highly karstified, coral limestone covered with dense scrub forest and coconut plantations. It displays dissolution features typical of similar tropical islands, including pit caves and flank margin caves. A freshwater aquifer exists with a water table 1.57m above MSL near the centre of the less karstified western two-thirds of the island, where surface elevations locally exceed 6m above MSL. All occurrences of potable freshwater, i.e. having electrical conductivity < 1500 µS cm-1, are also within this main part of the island. Complex hydrogeological conditions are indicated by the patterns of tidal influences on water levels in existing wells and natural dissolution holes. Using published studies and empirical relationships, it is estimated that Hoga contains a potable freshwater lens at least 2m thick (total volume c.300,000m3) and that annual recharge may exceed 500,000m3. As actual annual demand for freshwater since 2001 was < 2800m3, it is concluded that Hoga contains an aquifer that could sustain the present and likely future freshwater demands of residents and seasonal ecotourist populations, subject to satisfactory water quality assessment and management.
Classification: Paper.
Date: Received: 22 August 2006; Accepted 02 October 2006.
Bibliograph: DYKES, Alan P and John GUNN. (2006). Hoga island, Sulawesi, Indonesia: geomorphology and groundwater resources of a small tropical carbonate island. Cave and Karst Science 33(1), pp21-28.
 
Occurrence of the well shrimp Niphargus aquilex (Crustacea: Niphargidae) in Anglesey, North Wales, UK (pp29-30) (PDF 187KB)   
by John H BRATTON.
The subterranean amphipod crustacean Niphargus aquilex Schiödte is reported from Anglesey, Wales, for the first time. This record extends its known range in Britain and is farthest into the area covered by the Devensian ice, possibly supporting the theory that subterranean aquatic invertebrates survived within the glaciated area. The groundwater inhabiting diving beetles Hydroporus longulus Mulsant & Rey and H. ferrugineus Stephens (Dytiscidae) were found at the same site, the first records of these species from Anglesey.
Classification: Report.
Date: Received: 13 October 2005; Accepted 04 April 2006.
Bibliograph: BRATTON, John H. (2006). Occurrence of the well shrimp Niphargus aquilex (Crustacea: Niphargidae) in Anglesey, North Wales, UK. Cave and Karst Science 33(1), pp29-30.
 
A radiocarbon accelerator date from Hunters' Lodge Inn Sink, Priddy, Somerset, UK (pp31-32) (PDF 166KB)   
by Roger M JACOBI and Anthony R JARRATT.
Classification: Report.
Date: Received December 2005.
Bibliograph: JACOBI, Roger M and Anthony R JARRATT. (2006). A radiocarbon accelerator date from Hunters' Lodge Inn Sink, Priddy, Somerset, UK. Cave and Karst Science 33(1), pp31-32.
 
An introduction to the speleo-history of upper Nidderdale, Yorkshire, UK, to the early nineteen-sixties (pp33-40) (PDF 2.7MB)   
by Stephen A CRAVEN.
Classification: Report.
Date: Received 21 May 2006; Accepted 15 September 2006.
Bibliograph: CRAVEN, Stephen A. (2006). An introduction to the speleo-history of upper Nidderdale, Yorkshire, UK, to the early nineteen-sixties. Cave and Karst Science 33(1), pp33-40.
 
Abstracts Of the 2006 BCRA Cave Science Symposium (pp41-44) (PDF 279KB)   
Classification: Forum.
 
Thesis Abstracts (pp44-45) (PDF 248KB)   
1) Brown, Leslie (2005), Inception and development of conduits in the Cuilcagh Karst, Ireland. PhD thesis: School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield.
2) Beaney, Simon (2005), A Geophysical Investigation into imaging large cavities within karst limestone environments. MSc thesis: School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds.
Classification: Forum.
 
Book Reviews (p45) (PDF 546KB)   
1) Proudlove, Graham (ed.) (2006). Essential Sources in Cave Science [Cave Studies Series 16]. Buxton: British Cave Research Association. £4.50 plus postage. ISBN 0-900265-31-0. 56pp, A4, no illustrations.
2) Proudlove, Graham (2006), Subterranean Fishes of the World. Moulis, France: International Society of Subterranean Biology. £30.00 plus postage. ISBN 2-9527084-0-1. 300pp + xvii, 87 black and white figures, 20 colour plates.
Classification: Forum.
 
Some Other Recent Karst Publications (pp45-48) (PDF 546KB)   
Classification: Forum.
 

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